Monday, April 23, 2012

Beautiful vintage flower pot ideas…..

 

Beautiful Vintage Flower Pot Ideas

Flower pots give interior or exterior decor a refreshing finishing touch. All it takes is a little creative thinking to discover a world of ideas to find vintage flower pots. Take the time to peruse garage sales, estate sales, second-hand shops, trash and treasure emporiums and an attic or garage to collect vintage flower pots for indoor and outdoor plants and flowers.

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Some of the most unique vintage flower pots are fashioned from ordinary articles like antique vases, unusual containers and bottles. Even a small thirty or forty-year old soda pop bottle offers potential for use as a vintage flower pot. As long as containers have depth for planting and are wide enough to fill with soil, they are useful flower pots.

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Remember those old shallow cast iron skillets Grandma used in the kitchen? Fill them with potting soil, add flower seeds and it's an instant garden display. Old pottery is another source of vintage flower pots. Look for aged, crackled porcelain teacups, bowls and vases to fill with flowers Victorian like wood violets, daisies, Lily-of-the-Valley or Baby's Breath combined with Forget-Me-Not for a sweet reminder of days gone by. Bulb flowers like tulips, anemone, narcissus or Baby Iris are a lovely way to welcome spring.

Vintage flower pots are ideal for those interested in a Bonsai hobby. Antique gravy boats are perfect for this purpose. Look around for Oriental china tea cups for unique Bonsai flower pots. Vintage Triton shells, used to decorate gardens, can be useful as a flower pot too. Turn the shell so the open end can be filled with a little soil and add a few Irish moss roots. Then, watch an amazing sight. The large white shell is a flower pot filled with a creeping mossy occupant.

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Unusual Vintage Flower Pots

Antique shops can be a treasure trove of future vintage flower pots. Combine an old small-sized washboard with a slightly larger metal basin. Fill with potting soil and English Ivy and deep blue campanula (bellflower). Allow the ivy to climb against the washboard for support. Ivy can also be trained to look like an espalier in miniature by using ordinary florists tape.

Among unusual vintage flower pots are old fire buckets and milk pails. These do nicely for planting flowers, herbs or fern. They are usually deep enough to accommodate plants with long roots. In fact, an entire herb garden fits comfortably into a single milk pail. Keep it outdoors in summer and then bring it indoors in winter so fresh herbs are always available. Allow the herbs to return to seed, fall back into the soil and a bumper crop is the result.

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Old antique perfume bottles become beautiful flower pots or vases for fresh flowers delivered by a local florist. Some of these perfume bottles are made from cut crystal and give added beauty in bright sunlight when sunbeams dance and create a rainbow of prisms to enjoy. Look for old Dutch ovens and cauldrons for outdoor container gardens. These can be filled with contrasting flowers in attractive container arrangements.

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Ordinary canning jars can be filled with fresh cuttings received from an express flower delivery. Add colorful pebbles at the bottom and fill with water. Then, tie a large colorful ribbon at the neck of the jar and it becomes an instant vase. When the fresh flowers begin to fade, the jar gets a second use as a flower pot for gladioli, carnations or a planted bouquet of English lavender to scent a room or outdoor garden. Place several of the same vintage flower pots together in an garden or indoor floral arrangement for best visual effect. Old Spatterware tea cups are ideal for a windowsill garden of herbs or flowers. Line the bottom with a light layer of sand or gravel before filling them with soil. This will protect the metal from rust.

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Use a vintage mirror to make a collection of vintage crystal flower pots more elegant. Set the flower pots atop the mirror in a location where light will add to the beauty of the arrangement. Even certain bowl-shaped vintage toys serve double duty as vintage flower pots. All it takes is a little creativity.

About the Author

Patricia Hall works part-time for Serenata Flowers an online florist in UK and loves to surround herself with flowers at any given point of time. Even in her free time she loves to involve herself with everything flora and fauna.

'To me there is nothing more beautiful and global as the language of flowers - it is the easiest to understand all around the world in the same way. That is one reason why I truly admire flowers for what they represent in some ways - unity of all mankind!”

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Hope you will consider following me on Google Friends Connect or with the new Linky follower option.

8 comments:

Olive Cooper said...

Des, what a comprehensive discussion of containers for flowers. I cook with cast iron here in the Deep South still. Love galvanized containers for flowers. Joe nearly died a thousand deaths when I paid twenty dollars for a rusty bucket last year and put Black eyed Susan's from my garden in it. Hugs, olive

ℳartina @ Northern Nesting said...

Great images and great ideas Des! Have a great week!

Shenita @ Embellishments by SLR said...

What great ideas, Des! Vintage pots just add so much character!

Judy at GoldCountryCottage said...

Hi Des: WOW wouldn't a cast iron skillet look cute with some herbs planted in it..Gives me an idea. Thanks..Happy Monday..Judy

Bliss said...

OK, those little vintage pots are cute and I like the white bottles too.

~Bliss~

Anonymous said...

Hi Patty is here! Thanks for reading my article and that you seem to enjoy it!!! This makes me happy! :)

Amy @MaisonDecor said...

Hi Des, I just got a lot of perfume bottles without stoppers and they are all oldies...cute idea to use for flowers!~

Diane said...

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All the best,
Diane
info@coollectors.com